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Science Friday comes to SciLC!

National Public Radio's program, Science Friday, is acknowledged to be one of the finest live discussions of serious science issues broadcast anywhere, so it was a thrill for the APA Science Directorate when the show agreed to broadcast live from the Science Leadership Conference.

By Patricia Kobor

National Public Radio's program, Science Friday, is acknowledged to be one of the finest live discussions of serious science issues broadcast anywhere, so it was a thrill for the APA Science Directorate when the show agreed to broadcast live from the Science Leadership Conference. The many logistical and content arrangements took several months to complete.

Science Directorate staff worked with the Science Friday producers to develop ideas for seven topic areas, around which the meeting could offer key experts. The Science Friday producers chose "Gender Differences in Cognition" and "Stress and Health." Although we provided information about topics and participants, the producers had final say about both topics for the broadcast, and did a great deal of research on their own so that host Ira Flatow could ask good questions.

The scientists who took part were Diane Halpern, Janet Hyde, Lynn Liben, and Nora Newcombe for the Gender Differences panel, and Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, David Krantz, Wendy Berry Mendes, and Faris Tuma for the panel on Stress and Health.

An interesting addition to the broadcast was the inclusion of local high school students in the broadcast audience. Walt Whitman High School (Bethesda, Maryland) and Georgetown Preparatory High School (Washington, DC) both sent bright, talkative students. Several students had the courage to step up to the microphone and ask questions on the national broadcast.

To listen to the broadcast, go to the Science Friday web site and click on the show broadcast for December 2, 2005. For those in the studio audience, it was exciting to watch the show happen live.

In addition to the terrific staff of Science Friday, we must thank the National Science Foundation (whose support made it possible for Science Friday to have a remote broadcast), and the National Geographic Society for the many efforts that made the broadcast possible.