Results 110 of 9554 related to "Recovering emotionally from disaster "

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  • 1.Children and Trauma: Update for Mental Health Professionals
    Many children are exposed to traumatic life events, such as abuse, school violence, car accidents or terrorism. Short-term distress is common but most children and adolescents show resilience.
    Web Page (January 2011)
  • 2.Disasters & Terrorism
    People who go through or witness violent events such as school shootings, combat, rape, torture, natural disasters or accidents have experienced a traumatic stress. And some are repeatedly exposed to life or death situations in their work, such as EMT and rescue workers, police officers, fire fighters and military personnel. Discover how psychologists can help.
    Web Page
  • 3.Natural Disasters
    Even when you’re not hurt physically, disasters can take a serious emotional toll. Normal reactions include intense feelings; flashbacks; trouble concentrating; disrupted eating and sleeping; strained personal relationships; and headaches, nausea or chest pain.
    Psychology Topic
  • 4.Trauma
    Trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Reactions such as shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms.
    Psychology Topic
  • 5.Recovering from the wildfires
    Strong emotional reactions to a natural disaster are normal; but, you can take steps to restore your emotional well-being and a sense of control in your life.
    Web Article (August 2011)
  • 6.Disaster Response Network
    The APA Disaster Response Network is a group of licensed psychologists with training in disaster response who offer volunteer assistance to relief workers and survivors in the aftermath of disasters.
    Web Page
  • 7.Managing traumatic stress: After a tornado
    After tornadoes, understanding normal responses to these abnormal events can aid you in coping effectively with your feelings, thoughts and behaviors, and help you along the path to recovery.
    Web Article (August 2011)
  • 8.Managing traumatic stress: After the hurricanes
    Understanding common responses to extreme events can help you to cope effectively with your feelings, thoughts and behaviors. Putting into practice some of the tips in this guide can help you along the path to managing the storm's aftermath and feeling better.
    Web Article (May 2011)
  • 9.Crossroads: The Psychology of Immigration in the New Century
    This report describes the diverse population of immigrants and addresses the psychological experience of immigration, focusing on factors that impede and facilitate adjustment.
    Report
  • 10.Treating traumatized children
    Five years after Katrina, new data are illuminating the best ways to help children in New Orleans, Haiti, Chile and other disaster sites.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (July 2010)
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Results 110 of 9554 related to "Recovering emotionally from disaster "