Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety

Format: DVD [Closed Captioned]
Running Time: more than 100 minutes
Item #: 4310913
ISBN: 978-1-4338-1591-1
List Price: $99.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $69.95
Copyright: 2014
Availability: In Stock
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For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

APA Psychotherapy Training Videos are intended solely for educational purposes for mental health professionals. Viewers are expected to treat confidential material found herein according to strict professional guidelines. Unauthorized viewing is prohibited.
Description

In Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety, Amy Wenzel demonstrates the execution of this system of psychotherapy, which is based on the premise that inaccurate and unhelpful ways of thinking about oneself, the world, and the future have the potential to cause, exacerbate, and maintain emotional distress. Cognitive behavioral therapy's efficacy has been demonstrated extensively in empirical studies for a wide range of clinical presentations, including depression, anxiety, anger, addictions, personality disorders, and adjustment to medical illness.

In this demonstration, Dr. Wenzel works with a young woman who experiences life interference and substantial distress due to social anxiety. Dr. Wenzel uses cognitive restructuring to engage the client to identify, evaluate, and modify situational thoughts and underlying beliefs related to her anxiety.

Approach

Cognitive therapy is a system of psychotherapy that is based on the premise that inaccurate and/or unhelpful ways of viewing oneself, the world, and the future have the potential to cause, exacerbate, and/or maintain emotional distress.

At the heart of cognitive therapy is the cognitive case conceptualization, which is an intricate understanding of the beliefs and characteristic coping strategies that facilitate cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses in any one situation. One important task of cognitive therapists is to implement the strategy of cognitive restructuring, which helps clients to identify, evaluate, and if necessary, modify situational thoughts and underlying beliefs that are associated with emotional distress.

However, cognitive therapists maintain an equal focus on behavioral strategies, the implementation of which often produce fairly immediate reductions in emotional distress and serve as powerful agents of cognitive change. Cognitive therapists balance this focus on cognitive and behavioral change with attention to the therapeutic relationship, as well as strategies that promote acceptance.

Cognitive therapy's efficacy and effectiveness has been demonstrated countless times in the empirical literature for a wide range of clinical presentations, including depression, anxiety, anger, addictions, personality disorders, and adjustment to medical illness.

About the Therapist

Amy Wenzel, PhD, ABPP, is owner of Wenzel Consulting, LLC, clinical assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA, and an affiliate of the Postpartum Stress Center. She is an internationally recognized expert on cognitive therapy and regularly provides in-person workshops and webinars through her appointments on the speakers' faculties of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Cross-Country Education.

Dr. Wenzel has authored or edited 15 books, many on the delivery of cognitive therapy to special populations, and approximately 100 journal articles and book chapters on diverse topics such as cognitive processes in psychopathology, perinatal distress, suicide prevention, and interpersonal relationships.

Her research has been funded by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (formerly known as the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression), and the National Institute of Mental Health.

She is certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology in the specialty area of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology, and she has held leadership positions in the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.

Suggested Readings
  • Beck, J. S. (2011). Cognitive behavior therapy: Basics and beyond (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • Dobson, D., & Dobson, K. S. (2009). Evidence-based practice of cognitive–behavioral therapy. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • Dobson, K. S. (2012). Cognitive therapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Hofmann, S. G. (2012). An introduction to modern CBT: Psychological solutions to mental health problems. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Kuyken, W., Padesky, C. A., & Dudley, R. (2009). Collaborative case conceptualization: Working effectively with clients in cognitive–behavioral therapy. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • Persons, J. B. (2008). The case formulation approach to cognitive–behavior therapy. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  • Wenzel, A. (2013). Strategic clinical decision making in cognitive behavioral therapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Wright, J. H., Basco, M. R., & Thase, M. E. (2006). Learning cognitive–behavior therapy: An illustrated guide. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.

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