Drug Abuse Treatment Through Collaboration: Practice and Research Partnerships That Work

Pages: 326
Item #: 4316002
ISBN: 978-1-55798-985-7
List Price: $19.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $19.95
Copyright: 2003
Format: Hardcover
Availability: In Stock
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For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

Overview

In Drug Abuse Treatment Through Collaboration, James L. Sorensen and co-editors Richard A. Rawson, Joseph Guydish, and Joan E. Zweben begin to narrow the divide that exists between research and clinical practice. Bringing insights from their experience on both sides of the divide, they describe how the problem is partly a failure of communication. In the practitioner's view, research seems disconnected from clinical needs, and researchers may not be asking meaningful questions about treatment. From the researcher's view, treatment professionals may not seem open to new ideas, and the diffusion of knowledge to the field seems too slow. As a result, despite a boom in scientific findings related to neuroscience, pharmacology, health services delivery, and other related disciplines, there has been little more than a ripple in the clinical treatment of addiction.

This pioneering book promotes (and exemplifies) collaboration between research and practice in the substance abuse field. A multidisciplinary group of scientists and practitioners probe such topics as what field-developed treatments have attracted research attention, what research-developed treatments have been readily adopted into the field, and what is needed to bring researchers and practitioners into accord. It illustrates how, working together, researchers and practitioners can identify and further develop promising scientific protocols, employ the most rigorous standards to test them, and put into practice those treatments which prove to be most effective.

Table of Contents

Contributors

Forewords

  • A Challenge to Practitioners: Bringing Evidence-Based Practices Into Clinical Settings
    —H. Westley Clark
  • Blending Research and Practice: Designing Treatment Studies to Meet Real-World Needs
    —Alan I. Leshner

Preface

  1. The Need for Research-Practice Collaboration
    James L. Sorensen, Joseph Guydish, Richard A. Rawson, and Joan E. Zweben

I. Dissemination From Practice to Research

Introduction
—Joseph Guydish

  1. Therapeutic Communities: Research–Practice Reciprocity
    George De Leon
  2. Auricular Acupuncture for the Treatment of Cocaine Addiction
    Arthur Margolin
  3. Self-Help Groups
    Joseph Nowinski
  4. The Tacoma Syringe Exchange Studies: Public Health Practice Influences Research
    Holly Hagan, Don Des Jarlais, and David Purchase
  5. Drug Courts
    Elizabeth Piper Deschenes, Roger H. Peters, John S. Goldkamp, and Steven Belenko

II. Dissemination From Research to Practice

Introduction
—Joan E. Zweben

  1. Pharmacology, Practice, and Politics: A Tale of Two Opiate Pharmacotherapies
    Walter Ling, Richard A. Rawson, and M. Douglas Anglin
  2. Relapse Prevention in Substance Abuse Treatment
    Dennis M. Donovan
  3. Motivational Interviewing
    Theresa Moyers

III. Collaboration

Introduction
—Richard A. Rawson

  1. The Outcomes Movement in Addiction Treatment: Comments and Cautions
    A. Thomas McLellan
  2. Benefits of Integrating Assessment Technology With Treatment: The DENS Project
    Deni Carise and Õzge Gûrel
  3. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Demonstrations: Developing and Testing Community Interventions
    Dennis McCarty
  4. National and Local Perspectives on the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment Practice/Research Collaborative and Practice Improvement Collaborative Initiatives
    Alice A. Gleghorn and Frances Cotter
  5. Issues in Implementing PTSD Treatment Outcome Research in Community-Based Treatment Programs
    Elisa Triffleman
  6. Integrating Research into a Treatment Program
    Vivian B. Brown

IV. Implications

Introduction
—James L. Sorensen

  1. Science-Based Strategic Approaches to Dissemination
    Thomas E. Backer
  2. Recommendations for Practice–Research Collaboration
    Joseph Guydish, James L. Sorensen, Richard Rawson, and Joan E. Zweben

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Editors

Editor Bios

James L. Sorensen, PhD, is a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. With support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the American Foundation for AIDS Research, he has developed and evaluated numerous innovative treatment approaches. He has coauthored A Family Like Yours: Breaking the Patterns of Drug Abuse (with G. Bernal) and Preventing AIDS in Drug Users and Their Sexual Partners (with L. Wermuth, D. Gibson, K.-H. Choi, J. Guydish, and S. Batki) and has authored more than 170 professional publications. He is a member of the board of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and has served on the boards of American Psychological Association (APA) Divisions 50 (Addictions) and 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse), where he is president-elect.

Richard A. Rawson, PhD, is the associate director of the University of California at Los Angeles Integrated Substance Abuse Programs. During the past decade, he has worked with the U.S. State Department on large substance abuse research and treatment projects. He has published two books, 15 book chapters, and more than 100 professional papers and has conducted more than 1,000 workshops, paper presentations, and training sessions.

Joseph Guydish, PhD, is an associate adjunct professor of medicine and health policy at the University of California, San Francisco. He has led several studies funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. He has served on various local, state, and national committees related to substance abuse treatment, most recently as scientific advisor on a California statewide evaluation of drug courts.

Joan E. Zweben, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and APA Fellow. She is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. She is the founder and executive director of the 14th Street Clinic and Medical Group and the East Bay Community Recovery Project. Her books include Treating Patients With Alcohol and Drug Problems: An Integrated Approach (with R. Margolis) and The Alcohol and Drug Wildcard: Substance Abuse and Psychiatric Disorders in People With HIV Disease (with P. Denning). She has published more than 55 articles or book chapters and has edited 14 monographs on treating addiction.