Kudos

OEMA highlights recent honors, awards and achievements.

CEMA’s Jeffrey S. Tanaka Memorial Dissertation Award in Psychology

APA’s Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA) was very pleased to announce this year’s winner of its Jeffrey S. Tanaka Memorial Dissertation Award in Psychology competition. The CEMA Selection Sub-committee determined that the dissertation research titled, Stereotype Threat in Police Encounters: Why African Americans are at Risk of Being Targeted as Suspects (University of Illinois at Chicago, 2012), completed by Cynthia J. Najdowski, PhD, was the most outstanding. Although Najdowski was unable to travel to Hawaii to receive her award, CEMA acknowledged her research by providing a brief synopsis of it during its annual Social Hour/Awards Reception on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort Rainbow Suites I and II Lower Level-Rainbow Tower. 

The APA CEMRRAT2 Task Force Presented its Richard M. Suinn Minority Achievement Awards

On the evening of Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, the Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA) and the APA Commission on Ethnic Minority Recruitment, Retention and Training II (CEMRRAT2) Task Force (C2TF) Social Hour and Awards Reception took place at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort Rainbow Suites I and II Lower Level-Rainbow Tower. This year, two outstanding training programs were recognized for their outstanding contributions to the education, training and development of psychologists of color and received the 2013 Richard M. Suinn Minority Achievement Award. 

L to R: Photo 1: (L to R) CEMRRAT Chair, Beth Todd; Dr. David L. Blustein, Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology Department, Boston College; Dr. Maureen E. Kenny, Professor, Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College; Photo 2: (L to R) Representing the University of California, Irvine: Dr. Thomas Parham, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Dr. Jeanne E. Manese, Department Director Counseling Center Internship Program; Dr. Marcelle C. Holmes, Assistant Vice Chancellor, UC Irvine.

L to R: Photo 1: (L to R) CEMRRAT Chair Beth Todd; David L. Blustein, PhD, Counseling, Developmental and Educational Psychology Department, Boston College; Maureen E. Kenny, PhD, Professor, Counseling, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Boston College; Photo 2: (L to R) Representing the University of California, Irvine: Thomas Parham,PhD, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Jeanne E. Manese,PhD, Department Director Counseling Center Internship Program; Marcelle C. Holmes,PhD, Assistant Vice Chancellor, UC Irvine.


Lisa Goodman, PhD, the director of the Counseling Psychology Doctoral Program at Boston College Lynch School of Education Counseling Psychology with many of the current doctoral students accepted the award on behalf of their program. 

Jeanne Manese, PhD (director) and Frances Diaz, PhD, (training director/assistant director) accepted the award on behalf of the Counseling Center Internship Program at the University of California, Irvine along with a number of current internship students in the program. In addition, Thomas Parham, PhD, (vice chancellor, UC Irvine) and Joe White, PhD, (emeritus professor) spoke with great passion, humility and humor about the challenges of establishing the internship program at the UC Irvine Counseling Center many years ago.

Psychologist among those Honored by the White House in May 2013 as AAPI Women Champions of Change (Excerpt of White House Press Release issued on May 2, 2013)

On Monday, May 6, 2013, the White House honored 15 Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women as "Champions of Change." A part of the White House's observance of AAPI Heritage Month, this effort recognizes Asian-American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women who are doing extraordinary things to create a more equal, safe and prosperous future for their communities and the country.

"These 15 women represent the strength and diversity of the AAPI community. These leaders — in business, advocacy, philanthropy, sports, the arts and academia — are wonderful examples for young women across the country," said Valerie Jarrett, senior advisor to the president and chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls.

The Champions of Change program was created as an opportunity for the White House to feature groups of Americans — individuals, businesses and organizations — who are doing extraordinary things to empower and inspire members of their communities.

Among the recipients is our own Karen Suyemoto, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Boston. Suyemoto, is an associate professor of clinical psychology and Asian-American studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Suyemoto and her research team explore how racialized identities, ethnic affiliations and experiences of discrimination are associated with development and mental health for Asian-Americans. She provides consultation and training on anti-racist therapy and education both locally and nationally and is the past president of the Asian-American Psychological Association.

Division 45 Awards at APA Convention in Hawai’i

The APA Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues (Division 45) was much honored to bestow its annual awards during its business meeting at the APA convention in Honolulu. Congratulations to the following award recipients:

  • Asuncion Miteria Austria and John Robinson Distinguished Mentoring Award: Melba Vasquez, PhD, ABPP 
  • Emerging Professional — Contributions to Research Award: Joel Wong, PhD
  • Emerging Professional — Contributions to Service Award: Leondra Clark Harvey, PhD 
  • Charles and Shirley Thomas Award: Vivian Ota Wang, PhD
  • Distinguished Career Contribution to Research Award: Edward Delgado-Romero, PhD 
  • Distinguished Student Research: Erica Fung, MA
  • Toy Caldwell Colbert Distinguished Student Service: Sasheen Hazel, MA 

The APA Public Interest Directorate presented its 2013 Public Interest Awards 

Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (Early Career) 

Thema Bryant-Davis, PhD

Bryant-Davis has conducted socially-relevant research and published countless articles and book chapters on overarching topic of trauma recovery, and on global issues of HIV/AIDS and human trafficking. As president and past-president of the Society for the Psychology of Women (SPW), she undertook a bold initiative; production of a video on human trafficking that illustrates the connection between trafficking and slavery, the persuasiveness of the problem internationally and within the U.S., and best practices for working with trafficking survivors. 

Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest (Senior Career) 

Derald Wing Sue, PhD

Sue began his five-decade career as one of the first psychologists to explicitly identify the harmfulness of culturally-incompetent practice. His call to the field to address racial-cultural bias was revolutionary for its time, and subsequently, Sue chaired a 1981 Div. 17 committee charged with the development of multicultural counseling competencies. Under his leadership, the committee submitted a final report that was eventually adopted as the APA’s Multicultural Guidelines (APA, 2002). This watershed document helped pave the way for psychologists’ subsequent examination of all forms of identity and intersectionality throughout research, theory and practice. 

Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy 

Michelle Fine, PhD

Fine has made substantial contributions to psychology that support the solution of intransigent social problems. Professor Fine has made significant and long-term contributions to our understanding of educational inequalities, the impact of prison experiences and violence against women. From this research, she has authored countless articles and books. Her research in these three areas has included a strong focus on the ways that gender, race and social class operate within education and prison settings, and are played out in the context of violence against women. Fine has contributed expert and other forms of testimony with the legal system and has worked closely with an enormous number of community organizations and institutions in each of these areas.

APA ACT Raising Safe Kids Program is now in Japan

The APA ACT Raising Safe Kids Program is now in Japan. From Washington, D.C., to Humboldt County, Calif., and passing by New Jersey, Chicago, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Toledo, Pittsburgh, Lima, Cleveland, Michigan, Waltham, Mass., New Bedford, Mass., Miami, Orlando, San Francisco, Prescott Valley, Ariz., Storrs, Conn., Fairfax, Va., Reston, Va., Newport News, Va., Virginia Beach, Puerto Rico, Sao Carlos, Brazil and Ribeirao Preto, Brazil, Cali, Medellin, Colombia, Lima, Peru, Greece and many more communities, professionals and organizations are taking the research-based messages and knowledge about the importance of the early years and the skills for good positive effective parenting that can prevent violence and abuse. 

Through a Memorandum of Agreement with Alliant University/San Francisco Psychology Master’s Program in Japan and with some adaptations to the curriculum to address cultural issues, coordinators conducted on Aug. 30-31, 2013, the first ACT facilitators two-day training in Tokyo. The workshop went well, and 23 professionals, mental health professionals, pediatric doctors, preschool and elementary school teachers were prepared to take the program to their communities. 

Congratulations to the ACT Japan team and all the teams in this country and around the world for the fabulous job they do to help build strong and safe families.