Ethnicity and Health in America Series

This fall, the series held a talk on mental health considerations among Latino immigrant families. National American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month will be the focus of the next slate of events

The Ethnicity and Health in America Series is designed to raise public awareness concerning the varied health concerns of America’s people of color, while highlighting the impact of psychology and psychological factors on those health concerns. During four of the national heritage months dedicated to ethnic minority Americans (i.e., Black History Month in February, Asian-American/Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, National Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month in September, and National American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month in November); OEMA focuses on a chronic health condition particularly relevant to the ethnic group honored during that month. The Ethnicity and Health in America Series website is dedicated to providing information for each health concern and educational forums/workshops are sponsored in the community to educate the public regarding the significance of psychology to health. Please see the previous issue of the Communiqué for descriptions of activities honoring Black History Month in February and National Asian-American/Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May.

September/October

Left to Right: Tiffany G. Townsend, PhD, Sr. Director OEMA; Giselle Hass, PsyD, Program Facilitator; and Florencia Fuensalida, Hispanic Community Outreach SpecialistIn recognition of National Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15, 2012) , OEMA partnered with the Washington, D.C. Office of Latino Affairs, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology and The National Latina/o Psychological Association to raise awareness concerning mental health and treatment considerations among Latino populations with special attention given to Hispanic-Latino women. On Sept. 28, 2012, OEMA in collaboration with Azara Santiago-Rivera, PhD and the Chicago School of Professional Psychology presented renowned scholar and psychologist, Patricia Arredondo, EdD who discussed issues concerning contemporary Latino immigrant families. The talk, which was very well attended was held from 3-5 p.m. at the main campus of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Washington, D.C. campus and included a special introduction of Dr. Arredondo by APA past president, Melba J. T. Vasquez, PhD and additional remarks by APA CEO, Norman B. Anderson, PhD and OEMA Senior Director, Tiffany G. Townsend, PhD.

 
In addition, on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, from 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., OEMA, in partnership with the Washington, D.C. Office on Latino Affairs, sponsored a workshop on depression awareness for Latino women led by Giselle Hass, PsyD, which was held at the Office of Latino Affairs, 2000 14th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20009.

National American Indian /Alaska Native Heritage Month

National American Indian /Alaska Native Heritage Month will be the focus of the next Ethnicity and Health in America Series events. Please check the website for specifics on the topic and the upcoming events. It should be noted that the Ethnicity and Health in America Series is an opportunity for members to work with OEMA to provide content and information, and students or early career scholars may get some experience writing online articles to gain name exposure. If you are interested in working on the Ethnicity and Health in American Series with OEMA, please contact the office by email.

Educational forums/workshops for each health concern are also sponsored in the community to educate the public regarding the significance of psychology to health. If you are interested in working on the Ethnicity and Health in American Series with OEMA, please contact the office by email.