June 25, 2011

APA Announces Recipient of 2011 Excellence in Librarianship Award

WASHINGTON, DC—At the American Library Association Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA the American Psychological Association (APA) announced that Dr. David Baker, Margaret Clark Morgan Executive Director of the Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron, is the recipient of APA’s 2011 Excellence in Librarianship Award for his significant contributions to psychology and behavioral sciences librarianship.

In 1999, Dr. Baker became Director of the Archives of the History of American Psychology where his leadership and focus on education paved the way for the Archives to double the size of its repository, which now includes papers from over 740 psychologists; the Child Development Film Archives; famous psychology artifacts including apparatus, equipment, testing materials, and all forms of media; and other treasures unavailable anywhere else.  It was his outreach and fundraising efforts that lead to the establishment of the Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron, which houses the world’s largest collection of primary source historical materials related to the development of psychology in the United States and has since been made an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institute.  Dr. Baker, who earned a doctorate in counseling psychology in 1988, has further contributed to the field of psychology as a teacher, a member of several editorial boards, a community activist, a fundraiser, an author, a presenter, and through many other professional roles.

The American Psychological Association’s Excellence in Librarianship Award was created to recognize significant contributions or research within psychology and behavioral sciences librarianship.  The award, which consists of $2,500 and a commemorating plaque, was presented to Dr. David Baker on Saturday, June 25, 2011 at the EBSS Research Forum, during the American Library Association Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA.

The American Psychological Association (APA), in Washington, DC, is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and is the world’s largest association of psychologists. APA’s membership includes more than 154,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance psychology as a science, as a profession and as a means of promoting human welfare.