Feature

APA is the new owner of the Psychologist-Manager Journal, a quarterly publication geared to psychologists who work in management roles or with managers. The first APA issue was published in January.

The journal was previously owned by Taylor & Francis publishing. Its move to APA should do much to increase the journal's reach and influence, say co-editors William Siegfried, PhD, of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and George Yancey, PhD, of Emporia State University. Siegfried has been editor since 2008 and will continue in that role until the end of 2013. Yancey will become full editor at the end of 2013 and remain editor until 2018.

"APA's ownership will give us the chance to better connect with other psychologists who work in management or with managers," such as those in Div. 13 (Society of Consulting Psychology), Div. 14 (Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) and other relevant divisions, Yancey says. APA will promote the journal's growth through more marketing and by moving the editorial process online to help streamline the submissions and editing processes. These changes are enabling the editors to expand the journal's content in the following areas:

  • Practice submissions. "We want this to be an outlet that is practice-friendly, where contributors see that sharing their practice experiences is something we value," says Siegfried. To that end, the editors want to see more submissions to a section called "Live from the Firing Line," where psychologist-managers share insights on significant career gaffes and successes.
  • Special sections, including those suggested by readers and contributors. "It would be great to have people come forward with an idea that is especially compelling to them, take it and run with it," says Siegfried.
  • Book reviews. "We encourage practitioners to share reviews of books that have been especially helpful to them," says Yancey.

The editors welcome submissions to the other sections of the journal as well, including "The Theory of Management," which features articles that discuss theory that has clear relevance to the practice of psychology in management, and "Research Tools for the Psychologist-Manager," which highlights original empirical research that applies to the practicing psychologist-manager.

The journal is an important way to highlight the unique contributions of psychologists who work in these settings, Yancey adds.

"Psychologists focus not only on helping companies be more profitable, but on improving the quality of life for the people who work in them," he says. In this era of layoffs and cost cutting, that's a particularly valuable perspective to foster, he says.

To submit a manuscript, visit the journal's online submissions portal.
Tori DeAngelis is a writer in Syracuse, N.Y.