Feature

APA’s Div. 55 (American Society for the Advancement of Pharmacotherapy) and Div. 18 (Psychologists in Public Service) are sponsoring a full day of topical programming during APA’s Annual Convention, Aug. 12–15, in San Diego.

The daylong series of events set for Aug. 14 is called, “A Celebration of the Indian Health Service and a Culture of Wellness: The Partnership with the Prescribing Psychologist.”

The programming focus will be on the critical needs of Native American communities throughout our nation and the ways in which a variety of health and legal professionals, including prescribing psychologists, are working together with the Indian Health Service to make an impact on meeting those needs.

“It’s a great opportunity for psychology to serve our society,” says Beth N. Rom-Rymer, PhD, a private practice psychologist in Chicago and conference co-chair with Steven Tulkin, PhD, MS, director of the Postdoctoral Master of Science Program, California School of Professional Psychology. “We want to celebrate a culture of wellness in Native American communities and celebrate our partnership with the Indian Health Service.”

Co-sponsors include the Indian Health Service, Div. 8 (Society of Personality and Social Psychology), Div. 17 (Counseling), Div. 44 (Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues), Div. 45 (Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues), Div. 56 (Trauma Psychology), the California State Psychological Association, the Florida State Psychological Association, the Minnesota State Psychological Association, the California State Psychological Foundation, California School of Professional Psychology and International–Multicultural Initiatives (I-MERIT) of Alliant International University.

The program includes:

  • “The Role of the Indian Health Service in Promoting Health Among Native American Peoples,” Rose Weahkee, PhD, director, Division of Behavioral Health, Indian Health Service Headquarters, Washington, D.C.

  • “Protecting Native American Communities and Promoting Growth, Using both Tribal Law and Federal Law,” Joseph A. Myers, JD, executive director, National Indian Justice Center.

  • “Using Psychological Expertise to Promote Health in Ethnic Minority Communities,” Melba Vasquez, PhD, APA president-elect.

  • “The American Indian Teenager and the Impact of Bicultural Involvement in Tribal Cultures and Mainstream U.S. Society,” Teresa D. LaFromboise, PhD, professor, Stanford University.

  • “Native American Dance, Chanting and Storytelling,” with Grammy-nominated musician and psychologist Michael Brant DeMaria, PhD, and the Soaring Eagles.

  • “Prescriptive Authority for Psychologists on the Reservation: What Does that Mean for the Native American Community?” Rear Adm. Michael Milner, DHSc, United States Public Health Service.

  • “The ‘Talking Circle’ Model of Native Health Service Delivery,” Felicia Schanche Hodge, DrPH, University of California, Los Angeles.

  • “The Joys of Mentoring Native American Students and Promoting Excellent Mental Health Practices,” Winona Simms, PhD, Stanford University.

  • “Native American Women, Violence and the Federal and Tribal Justice Systems,” Kelly Myers, JD, National Indian Justice Center.

Discussants for all sessions will include prescribing psychologists working on Indian reservations in New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.


For more information on the program and to register for the conference, which includes lunch, visit Division 55.