Candidates for APA President

Q1.  What do you see as three of the biggest challenges facing psychology in the next 10 years?

How will psychology be viewed in health care, science and by the public? Will psychology be a major player or a minor participant? Will psychologists be central to integrated health-care delivery, or will social workers, nurses, etc., serve in that role? Will other scientists turn to psychologists for their expertise as central members of multidisciplinary research teams, or will epidemiologists, health educators, etc., serve in that role? Will the public turn to psychologists for their expertise in understanding human behavior — both in society and in their own lives — or will they look to physicians, journalists, etc., for answers?

Q2.  What would you do to lead the profession to address the needs of an increasingly diverse and global society?

An increasingly diverse and global society has complex effects on behavior, markedly changing the fabric of societies across the world. Psychology must lead by applying its substantial scientific expertise to understanding these complex effects at every level. Psychology must lead by providing scientifically based guidance — to practitioners, those designing public policy, other scientists and the public — to improve the human condition. Psychology must lead by providing psychological care that recognizes the importance of cultural diversity. Psychology must lead by educating the next generation of psychologists to become effective scientists and practitioners in an increasingly diverse and global society.