Sample Response to D.1. — Course Content Requiring Citations

The demonstration of program credibility can include citations to relevant peer-reviewed research and reference to broader, recognized traditions of research and theory, among others:

Example D.1. “The Use of Expressive Arts in Psychotherapy”

Insufficient Response

The use of expressive arts in psychotherapy has a longstanding tradition. Music, dance and other creative arts are valuable additions to successful psychotherapeutic practice. This program illustrates a range of expressive arts and their potential applications in the treatment of emotional distress.

Drawing from their extensive clinical experience, the presenters demonstrate a variety of expressive techniques that help open clients to new forms of mental health, adjustment and optional functioning by helping them to recognize and experience their internal response.

This program is derived from the work of S. Smith, Clinical Applications of the Expressive Arts (New York: Stonewall Publications, 2000).

Acceptable Response

The use of expressive arts in psychotherapy has a longstanding tradition. Music, dance and other creative arts are valuable additions to successful psychotherapeutic practice. This program illustrates a range of expressive arts and their potential applications in the treatment of emotional distress.

Drawing from the fields of art therapy, dance therapy and other allied fields of recreational and occupational therapy, this program overviews the historical traditions, current research findings and practice knowledge that inform the application of arts in psychotherapeutic practice.

This program is derived from the following works:

McNamara and Scott (2000), Historical Research in Music Therapy, 3rd Edition.

Douglas, D.B., (2001). Effectiveness of the Expressive Arts in Psychotherapeutic Practice:  Documentation of Research in Clinical Practice. Journal of Arts in Medicine, 3, 121-134.

Stanford, L.M. and Dickson, E.E. (2001). A controlled study of the effects of expressive arts as adjunctive techniques in psychotherapy. Journal of Psychotherapy Research, 33, 211-228.

Note: The insufficient program description draws primarily from presenter experience and only minimal, non peer-reviewed publications. The acceptable response clearly identifies relevant research literature that supports both the application of the expressive arts and their associated outcomes within relevant clinical contexts.