Gifted Dialogue Graduate Student Editorial Board

What does Gifted Dialogue offer graduate students in psychology?

Gifted Dialogue offers graduate students in psychology a forum to discuss their research ideas through their own student-directed featured column. The Graduate Student Advisory Board of Gifted Dialogue, managed by doctoral student Bess Worley, II, works in tandem with the newsletter’s Editorial Advisory Board, made up of Maureen Neihart, Psy.D., Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Ph.D., Julia Osborn, Ph.D., Nancy Robinson, Ph.D., and Frank Worrell, Ph.D. The Graduate Student Advisory Board is responsible for soliciting, selecting, and editing columns and feature articles submitted by graduate students.

What areas of psychology does giftedness involve?

Giftedness involves many areas of psychology including but not limited to developmental psychology, psychology in the arts, educational psychology, school psychology, counseling psychology, sports psychology, and clinical child psychology. Graduate students interested in the social and emotional development of adolescents, Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, creativity, performance anxieties and successes, underachievement, perfectionism, testing and assessment, resiliency, and intelligence will find the newsletter of interest.

Who is the Graduate Student Editorial Board?

Bess B. Worley II, Chair of the GSEAB, is a doctoral student in the Educational Policy, Planning, and Leadership program, Gifted Education emphasis, at the College of William and Mary. She received her BME from Baylor University and has worked in private and public music programs at the K-12 level. While completing her MSEd at Baylor, Bess was a teacher of elementary gifted and talented students and the Assistant Managing Editor of Gifted Child Today. She is a research assistant, webmaster, and student editor of Systems for the Center for Gifted Education at the College of William and Mary. You may e-mail Bess. Write in the e-mail subject heading: Att: Bess Worley.

Andrea Esperat is a doctoral student in Clinical and School Psychology at the University of Virginia, having just completed a master’s degree in Educational Psychology (Gifted). She works as a research assistant at the National Research Center for the Gifted and Talented and teaches psychology at the University of Virginia’s Summer Enrichment Program. Her research interests include the socio-emotional development of gifted children, twice-exceptional and economically disadvantaged gifted children, and the neuropsychological underpinnings of giftedness. In addition, she is committed to educating clinicians and parents about the wonders of giftedness and how to better understand and support gifted children.

Anne N. Rinn is a doctoral student at Indiana University, where she is majoring in Educational Psychology with a minor in Higher Education/Student Affairs. Her research focuses primarily on the intellectual, social, and emotional development of gifted college students, as well as programming designed for gifted college students (e.g., honors colleges) and the historical development of honors programs in the United States.

Jessica L. Viergutz’s educational awakening began at Colby High School. A Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a three-month volunteer journey at an Egyptian orphanage led to a Masters degree and Doctoral program in Clinical Psychology through Argosy University in Bloomington, MN. Her dissertation, Mental Health Needs of Foster Children, underlines her professional focus: children and families, trauma, and attachment. She is currently completing her pre-doctoral internship at Ulster County Mental Health Department in New York.

How do I get published in Gifted Dialogue?

Gifted Dialogue is an online publication of the Center for Gifted Education Policy, which is funded through the American Psychological Foundation and housed in the American Psychological Association's Education Directorate. Gifted Dialogue offers graduate students in psychology a forum to discuss their research ideas related to giftedness and gifted education through their own student-directed featured column. The Graduate Student Advisory Board is responsible for soliciting, selecting, and editing columns and feature articles submitted by graduate students.

Submissions to the Graduate Student Column are reviewed by the Graduate Student Editorial Advisory Board (GSEAB). Submissions should be original works and will be certified as unpublished by the author’s consent for review by the GSEAB. Only graduate students enrolled in a program related to areas of psychology or gifted education will be considered. Submissions should be 500 - 1000 words in length and follow the APA style (as outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association). Manuscripts should be formatted as compatible with standard word processing programs or saved as a general text file.

Manuscripts should be sent via e-mail to CGEP, Attn: GSEAB by the submission deadlines posted for each issue at Gifted Dialogue. An e-mail message should accompany each submission and include the author’s name, school and program, home and work e-mail addresses, the word processing program used, and a phone number where the author can be easily reached.

Manuscripts should clearly address the topic designated for the issue with the corresponding submission date. Each manuscript will be reviewed by a minimum of two GSEAB members using a rubric addressing submission guidelines and quality. Approximate response time regarding acceptance of a manuscript will be four weeks. Any questions should be addressed to the Chief Editor (Bess Worley) of the GSEAB at CGEP, Attn: Chief Editor, GSEAB.