Council of Representatives: August 11 & 15, 2010

Draft Minutes

I. MINUTES OF MEETING

A.(1)  Council voted to approve the minutes of the February 19-21, 2010, Council of  Representatives Meeting.

II. ELECTIONS, AWARDS, MEMBERSHIP AND HUMAN RESOURCES

A.(2)  Council voted to discontinue the annual dues increase based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) through 2013.

B.(3)  Council voted to approve an increase to the standard International Affiliate membership fee to $50, phased in over a three-year period ($34 in 2011, $42 in 2012 and $50 in 2013), and an increase to the International Affiliate membership fee for colleagues from developing/low income countries to $22, phased in over the same three year period ($20 in 2011, $21 in 2012, and $22 in 2013).

These changes will be evaluated for the next three years to provide the Council of Representatives with an accounting of the numbers of international affiliates and budgetary consequences of this fee increase.  If the numbers of international affiliates fall during the 2011 year, then a three-year phase-in for the developed nations will occur.  If the numbers stay the same or increase, the phasing will proceed in two years, with a one-third increase in 2011 and a two-thirds increase in 2012.

C.(3A)  Council voted to elect 153 members listed to initial Fellow status, on the nomination of the indicated divisions and on the recommendation of the Fellows Committee and the Board of Directors.

D.(30) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “APA Campaign Finance Report.”

III. ETHICS

No items.

IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A.(4)  Council voted to receive the Report of the 2009 Presidential Task Force on the Future of Psychology as a STEM Discipline.

B.(5)  Council voted to request that its August meeting days be changed from Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 12 noon to Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

C.(6)  Council voted to approve the following motion:

Council affirms its support for diversity training for APA governance members and requests that  diversity training on the topic of "lmmigration and Immigrants" be provided to Council at its  February 2011 meeting and to boards and committees at the March 2011 Consolidated Meetings.  The format of this training will reflect the recommendations of President Goodheart’s Working  Group on Diversity Training, to enhance governance members' understanding of critical diversity issues.

In addition, Council requests that, based on the Working Group recommendations and feedback  from APA boards and committees, CSFC provide a report in February 2011 that includes  clarification of 1) the specific goals of diversity training for governance and 2) the evaluation of  effectiveness of diversity training for governance.

D.(7)  Council voted to postpone the item “APA Convention and Meeting Facility Contract Procedures and Cancellation Clause” to Its August 2011 meeting. 

E.(23B) A new business item “Educating and Training Psychologists to Participate in Multi-Disciplinary Team Science Involving Other Stem Disciplines” was referred to the Board of Scientific Affairs (BSA), the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA), and the Policy and Planning Board.

F.(23C)  A new business item “Provision of Adequate Resources to Address the Advocacy Goals of the Strategic Plan Objective 3 and the STEM Task Force” was referred to BSA and BEA.

V. DIVISIONS AND STATE AND PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS

A.(8)  Council voted to approve the following motion:

The Council of Representatives shall receive the list of Council New Business Items and the designated referral groups assigned by the Agenda Planning Group.  It shall be the responsibility of Council members to inform their various constituent groups of any items that may be relevant, whether with regard to impact, expertise, or perspective. It will be the responsibility of the constituent group to contact the referral group with such information.

In addition, Council members will be provided with access to the cross-cutting agenda items when they are presented to boards and committees so that divisions and states, provinces and territories can have the opportunity to offer expertise, consider the impact, and/or share relevant perspectives with the appropriate groups.

B.(9) Council voted to approve forwarding the following amendments to the APA Bylaws to the membership for a vote (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

Article V
Composition of Council

7. The number of seats for Representatives from Divisions and State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Associations allocated through the apportionment vote process shall be 162.  Each Division and each State/Provincial/Territorial Association shall be allocated a minimum of one seat on Council. The 162 [Representatives] seats will be divided into 2 pools, one for State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Associations and one for Divisions.  The percentage of the 162 seats for State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Associations shall correspond to the percentage of total apportionment votes allocated to State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Associations and the percentage of the 162 seats for Divisions shall correspond to the percentage of total apportionment votes allocated to Divisions. If either pool is not large enough to give one seat to each unit, enough seats will be transferred from the other pool to accomplish that requirement.

[Each Division shall be allocated one seat from the Division Pool and each State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Association shall be allocated one seat from the State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Association Pool.]  The awarding of additional seats [allocated to] from those remaining in each Pool shall be based on the percentage of allocated votes received by a Division or State/Provincial/Territorial Psychological Association and calculated as follows:

1.5% to less than 2.5%…….1 additional seat
2.5% to less than 3.5%…….2 additional seats
3.5% to less than 4.5%…….3 additional seats
etc.

Additional seats will be allocated to those units in a Pool entitled to additional seats in the following manner.  The unit with the highest percentage in the Pool will receive the first additional seat and an additional seat will be assigned to other units entitled to one or more additional seats in descending order of their percentages. If, after all units in a Pool entitled to one or more additional seats have received one additional seat, there remain units that are entitled to two or more additional seats, and if the seats allocated to the Pool have not been exhausted, the unit in the Pool with the highest percentage will receive a second additional seat and a second additional seat will be assigned to other units entitled to two or more additional seats in descending order of their percentages.  This process shall be continued until either all additional seats allocated to the Pool have been assigned or until all units in the Pool entitled to additional seats have been assigned all of the seats to which their percentages of allocated votes entitle them.

If, after all units in a Pool have been assigned the additional seats to which they are entitled by virtue of their percentages, there remain seats allocated to a Pool which have not been assigned, those remaining seats shall be assigned to the units in the Pool in the order in which the units came closest to being awarded another seat as a result of the allocated votes.

Council voted to include pro and con statements with the Bylaw amendment ballot.

VI. ORGANIZATION OF THE APA

No items.

VII. PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS

A.  Council received an update from Gary VandenBos, PhD, Executive Director of APA’s Publications and Databases (P&D) Directorate, on the P&D Program. The Office of Publications and Databases contributes to various strategy planning goals, including name recognition and reputation enhancement (e.g., Publication Manual, PsycINFO), member involvement (e.g., 25,000 involved in journals operations and various roles), and financial contribution to APA’s operating budget. Ongoing efforts in marketing APA books, journals, and databases, both nationally and internationally, have resulted in a solid growth – in utilization and revenue.  Significant electronic enhancement features have been implemented during the last 10 years, with new features added annually.  APA is the largest of the “small” scholarly publishers.  While external threats (such as industry consolidation, consortia expansion, new technologies, open access initiatives and emerging non-traditional publishers) exist, there are also opportunities to expand markets, upsell existing clients, and make more strategic use of business information and leads.  Each year, totally new content must be created to sustain existing revenue streams, in addition to developing new products and revenue streams.

VIII. CONVENTION AFFAIRS

No items.

IX. EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(9)  Council voted to approve an extension for recognition of Industrial-Organizational Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for an additional period of one year.

B.(10)  Council voted to approve an extension for recognition of Sport Psychology as a proficiency in professional psychology for an additional period of one year.

C.(11)  Council voted to approve the continued recognition of Psychopharmacology as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

D.(12)  Council voted to approve the recognition of Personality Assessment as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

E.(13)  Council voted to approve the recognition of Professional Geropsychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology. 

F.(14)  Council voted to approve the continued recognition of Clinical Neuropsychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

G.(15)  Council voted to approve the continued recognition of Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2017 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

X. PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(16)  Council voted to approve the request to withdraw Council New Business item #31F: “Infusing the Association Guidelines in the Public Interest Which Have Been Adopted by Council for Psychologists Throughout APA.”

B.(23A)  A new business item “Telepsychology Guidelines for Psychologists” was referred to the Board of Professional Affairs (BPA), the Committee on International Relations in Psychology, the Committee on Rural Health and the Committee on Legal Issues.

C.(24) Council received an update on the business pending item “Best Practice Guidelines on Prevention, Practice, Research, Training and Social Advocacy for Psychologists.”

D.(25)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Structure and Function of an Interdisciplinary Team for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury.”

E.(26)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Submission of Revised Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology for comment, review and revision, consistent with APA Rule 30.8.” 
 
F.(28)  Council received as information the item “Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Involvement of Psychology” and Pierre L. Ritchie, PhD, and Geoffrey Reed, PhD, presented an update to Council. 
 
G.(31)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Recognition of Psychotherapy Effectiveness.”

H.(32)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Implications of the Model Licensing Act (MLA) for I/O Psychology.”

I.(33)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Strategies for education and training of psychologists in the use of ICD-10-CM.”

XI. SCIENTIFIC AFFAIRS

A.(34)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Affirming, Supporting, and Disseminating Psychological Research on Global Climate Change.”

B.(35)  Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Affirming Research on Global Climate Change.”

XII. PUBLIC INTEREST 
 
A.(17)  Council voted to adopt as APA policy the following revised APA Resolution on Homelessness:

WHEREAS safe, stable, affordable, accessible and permanent housing is a basic need, and its absence negatively impacts typical development, physical and mental health, academic success, family cohesion, and the ability to exercise individual rights and responsibilities (e.g. Zlotnick & Zerger, 2008; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2003; Donahue & Tuber, 1995; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009);

WHEREAS homelessness and risk of homelessness is matter of public health concern (e.g. Krieger & Higgins, 2002; Schnazer Dominguez, Shrout & Caton, 2007);

WHEREAS populations who have historically been discriminated against and marginalized have been disproportionately affected by the lack of affordable, accessible, safe and stable housing. Such oppressed groups include: racial and ethnic minorities, (e.g. African Americans, Native Americans), refugees and immigrants, older adults, veterans, persons with disabilities, including mental illness, female heads of household with children and youth, unaccompanied youth -- many of whom are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, and/or youth aging out of foster care systems  (e.g. Lehman and Cordray, 1993; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2008; U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2009; Toro, Dworsky & Fowler, 2007; Shinn, 2007; Cochran, Stewart, Ginzler & Cauce, 2002);

WHEREAS ethnic minorities and marginalized persons including women have been disproportionately impacted by subprime loans, lower incomes, lower salaries, and higher unemployment rates which all contribute to homelessness (Manneh, 2008);

WHEREAS in times of economic downturn, job loss and high rates of underemployment and unemployment, more persons in urban, suburban and rural areas lose their homes, or are at risk of homelessness (e.g. U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2009; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2008); and where ethnic minorities are especially vulnerable and at risk for losing the most (Manneh, 2008);

WHEREAS homelessness results from structural systemic issues including the lack of affordable housing;  insufficient supportive community-based services, especially those intended to treat mental illnesses and/or substance abuse; under-funded schools that cannot adequately build foundations for academic or vocational success; limited job training programs and opportunities; a shortage of affordable day care and after school programs to support female-headed families; job layoffs; underemployment and unemployment; and escalating costs of food, housing and transportation (e.g. Bosman, 2009; National Alliance to End Homelessness (2009, 2010); National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009); Rafferty & Shinn, 1991; Zlotnick, Robertson, & Lahiff, 1999);

WHEREAS psychosocial stressors impacting mental and physical health are often associated with entrance into and exit from homelessness, and where expanded access to culturally competent, community-based prevention, intervention and treatment services, along with structural changes, contributes to the remediation of homelessness (e.g. Burt et al., 1999; Burt, Person & Montgomery, 2007; Haber & Toro, 2004; Morse et al., 1996);

WHEREAS the field of psychology is uniquely poised to contribute to the amelioration of homelessness through scientific research, program design and evaluation, education and training, advocacy, and the culturally competent assessment and treatment of persons across the life span who are without homes or at risk of homelessness (e.g. Haber & Toro, 2004; Shinn, 1992);

And WHEREAS psychologists aspire to enhance the physical, emotional and behavioral well being of all persons, especially those who are marginalized and most vulnerable (Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network, 2000; 2003).

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that:

the Council of Representatives of the American Psychological Association reaffirm its commitment to advance psychology’s contributions to ending homelessness in the following actions:

Direct research efforts towards the prevention of homelessness in marginalized and vulnerable populations; design a plan to disseminate an evidence-based intervention plan for those currently experiencing homelessness or at imminent risk of homelessness; support and/or conduct applied research on service utilization among chronically and pervasively mentally ill populations at risk for homelessness; and the evaluation of programs that support rapid return to stable and permanent housing.

Investigate methods and interventions to promote resilience in different populations at risk for homelessness including those within rural versus urban areas, single males versus female heads of household with children, unaccompanied youth (many of whom are gay, lesbian or transgendered and/or youth aging out of foster care systems), racial and ethnic minorities (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans), refugees and immigrants, persons reentering communities following incarceration, older adults, veterans, or persons with disabilities including mental illness (among other vulnerable populations). Recognize that implementation success may well require a change in approach, such as reducing the use of substance abuse as a basis of denial for shelter or services (Kosa, 2009; U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, 2008).

Recommend training and educational practices that enhance the ability of psychologists to work effectively with populations at risk of homelessness or currently living without homes by expanding graduate school curricula focused on diverse and underserved populations; creating internships and continuing education to encourage psychologists to work with populations experiencing homelessness; and enlisting psychologists to offer appropriate mental health education programs to service providers, community-based organizations, community volunteers and the public at large focused on the remediation of homelessness.

Encourage psychologists to provide strength based clinical and assessment services to populations who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Culturally competent services shall address a continuum of needs and focus on serving people in the communities in which they and their families live, and will take into consideration how specific structural systemic issues interact in different combinations and in different ways for specific populations. Psychologists are encouraged to establish meaningful collaborations with physicians, nurses, social workers, educators, service providers and advocates committed to addressing the multifaceted needs of persons who are experiencing homelessness or at risk of losing their homes.

Promote and advocate for policies and legislation that support the rapid reentry of persons into stable, safe, affordable and permanent housing. Including:

  • Legislation that funds comprehensive services as well as safe, stable, affordable least restrictive and most appropriate and accessible housing in urban, suburban and rural areas.

  • Advocate for funding for targeted comprehensive services, education and job training opportunities for youth in foster care, and for transitional services for those returning to home placement and/or communities.

  • Advocate for education, job training and affordable day care to support families, including but not limited to poor and low income families.

  • Legislation that would provide expanded funding for a range of mental health services for families, including but not limited to at risk families, unaccompanied youth and children in foster care placements, as well as persons of all ages with disabilities.

  • Advocate for health care coverage for those without homes and at risk of losing stable or permanent housing.

  • Advocate for an increase in mental health, substance abuse and alcohol abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  • Advocate for comprehensive supportive services that promote the strengthening of families.

  • Advocate that public funds be provided to finance not only emergency responses to homelessness, but also to implement preventative programs to reduce the incidence and prevalence of homeless persons and families.

  • Advocate for stricter regulations governing financial institutions, predatory lending, credit, and mortgage practices.

  • Disseminate accurate information about homelessness to psychologists, policymakers, and the public to call attention to structural systemic issues that exacerbate homelessness. Suggest both psychological (e.g. clinical) and systemic structural interventions for those who suffer the consequences of poverty and homelessness.

References

Bosman, J. (2009, July 28). Homeless families could face eviction from shelters over rules. The New York Times.  Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

Burt, M. R., Aron, L. Y., Douglas, T., Valente, J., Lee, E., & Iwen, B.  (1999). Homelessness:  Programs and the people they serve (summary report). Washington, DC: Urban Institute. 

Burt, M. R., Pearson, C., & Montgomery, A.E. (2007). Community wide strategies for preventing homelessness. Journal of Primary Prevention, 28, 265-279.

Cochran, B. N., Stewart, A. J., Ginzler, J. A., & Cauce, A. M.  (2002). Challenges faced by homeless sexual minorities: Comparison of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender homeless adolescents with their heterosexual counterparts. American Journal of Public Health, 92, 773-777.

Donahue, P. J. & Tuber, S. B. (1995). The impact of homelessness on children’s level of aspiration. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 59, 249-255.

Haber, M., & Toro, P. A.  (2004). Homelessness among families, children and adolescents: An ecological-developmental perspective. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 7, 123-164. http://usmayors.org/pressreleases/uploads/USCMHungercompleteWEB2009.pdf

Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network. (2000). Mental illness, chronic homelessness: An American disgrace. Healing Hands, 4(5), 1-2. Retrieved from:  http://www.nhchc.org/Network/HealingHands/2000/October2000HealingHands.pdf

Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians’ Network. (2003). Homelessness and family trauma: The case for early intervention. Healing Hands, 7(2), 1-3. Retrieved from: http://www.nhchc.org/Network/HealingHands/2003/hh-0503.pdfKrieger, J., & Higgins, D. L. (2002). Housing and health: Time again for public health action. American Journal of Public Health, 92, 758-768.

Kosa, F. (2009). The homemakers. Miller-McCune, March-April, 2009. Retrieved March 23, 2010 http://www.miller-mccune.com/business-economics/the-homemakers-3843/

Lehman, A. F., & Cordray, D. S. (1993). Prevalence of alcohol, drug, and mental disorders among the homeless: One more time. Contemporary Drug Problems, 20, 355-383.

Manneh, S. (2008). In economic downshift, minorities risk losing most. Retrieved from http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=8066e344ffa64d97566b5fe357992b20&from=rss

Morse, G. A., Calsyn, R. J., Miller, J., Rosenberg, P., West, L., & Gilliland, J. (1996). Outreach to homeless mentally ill people: Conceptual and clinical considerations. Community Mental Health Journal, 32, 261-274.

National Coalition for the Homeless (2009, July). Fact sheet: Who is homeless? Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved March 22, 2010 http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/Whois.pdf

National Alliance to End Homelessness (2010, March). Chronic homelessness: Policy solutions. Washington, DC: Author.  Retrieved March 22, 2010 http://www.endhomelessness.org/content/article/detail/2685

National Alliance to End Homelessness (2009, Sept). Geography of homelessness, Part 3: Subpopulations by geographic type. Washington, DC: Author.  Retrieved March 22, 2010 http://www.endhomelessness.org/content/article/detail/2529

Rafferty, Y., & Shinn, M. (1991). The impact of homelessness on children. American Psychologist, 46, 1170-1179.

Schnazer, B., Dominguez, B., Shrout, P. E., & Caton, C. L. (2007) Homelessness, health status and health care use. American Journal of Public Health, 97, 464-469.

Shinn, M. (1992). Homelessness: What is a psychologist to do? American Journal of Community Psychology, 20, 1-24.

Shinn, M. (2007). International homelessness: Policy, socio-cultural, and individual

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2003).  Blueprint for change: Ending chronic homelessness for people with serious mental illnesses and co-occurring substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Toro, P. A., Dworsky, A., & Fowler, P.J.  (2007). Homeless youth in the United States:  Recent research findings and intervention approaches.  In D. Dennis, G. Locke, & J. Khadduri (Eds.), Toward understanding homelessness: The 2007 National Symposium on Homelessness Research.  Washington, DC:  U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

U.S. Conference of Mayors (2008). Hunger and homelessness survey: A status report on hunger and homelessness in America’s cities. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://usmayors.org/pressreleases/documents/hungerhomelessnessreport_121208.pdf.

U.S. Conference of Mayors (2009). Hunger and homelessness survey: A status report on hunger and homelessness in America’s cities. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from
http://usmayors.org/pressreleases/uploads/USCMHungercompleteWEB2009.pdf

U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (2008, March). Inventory of federal programs that may assist homeless families with children. Washington, DC: Author.  Retrieved March 23, 2010
http://www.usich.gov/library/publications/FamilyInventory_Mar2008.pdf

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, (2008): The 2008 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress.  Retrieved from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban  Development website:  http://www.hudhre.info/documents/4thHomelessAssessmentReport.pdf

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, (2008): The 2008 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress.  Retrieved from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development website: http://www.hudhre.info/documents/4thHomelessAssessmentReport.pdf

Zlotnick, C., & Zerger, S.  (2008). Survey findings on characteristics and health status of clients treated by the federally funded (US) Health Care for the Homeless Program. Health and Social Care in the Community, 17, 18–26. 

Zlotnick, C., Robertson, M. J., & Lahiff, M. (1999). Getting off the streets: Economic resources  
and residential exits from homelessness, Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 209-224.

B.(18)  Council voted to (1) reaffirm the American Psychological Association (APA)’s 2004 Resolution on Sexual Orientation and Marriage, (2) acknowledge with pride the eleven amicus briefs that APA has filed in legal cases on marriage equality for same-sex couples in which the scientific research that supports APA’s position has been presented to the courts, including the California Supreme Court in 2006, (3) direct staff to create and distribute informational materials to publicize APA’s history and position on marriage equality for same-sex couples and the science that supports that position, and (4) request that the APA boards and committees consider an updated draft resolution on Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples based on the evolving research.

C.(19)  Council voted to receive the report Resilience and Recovery after War: Refugee Children and Families in the United States.

D.(23D)  A new business item “Resolution on Aid in Dying” was referred to the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, BPA and the Committee on Psychology and AIDS.

E.(27)  Council received an update on the business pending item “Value Neutral Language for End-of-Life Choices.” 
 
XIII. ETHNIC MINORITY AFFAIRS

A.(20)  Council voted to approve the following motion:

Council finds that the program of fully reimbursing ethnic minority members of Council for their attendance at the February and August Council meetings (first approved by Council in August 2001) has been helpful in increasing ethnic minority representation on Council and should be continued.

Since the inception of the reimbursement program for ethnic minority members, Council approved a policy that became effective in January 2006 to provide that all Council members be fully reimbursed for their attendance at the February meeting of Council and for the cost of two night’s stay at the headquarters hotel where Council is housed for the convention meeting of Council.
     
APA strongly encourages Divisions and State, Provincial and Territorial Associations to submit one or more slates of nominees comprised solely of ethnic minorities.  In order to continue to provide incentives for Divisions and State, Provincial and Territorial Associations to elect ethnic minorities to Council, APA shall provide full reimbursement (transportation, hotel and meal charges) for ethnic minority members of Council who are elected during the years 2011-2013 for their attendance at the convention meeting of Council.

For purposes of this program, ethnic minority identity is determined by self-identification as a member of one of the following four U.S. ethnic minority groups: African American/Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian American/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic / Latino.

XIV. INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

No items.

XV. CENTRAL OFFICE

No Items.

XVI. FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

A.(21)  Council voted to approve the 2011 Preliminary Revenue and Expense budgets and footnotes as the basis for the Fall budget process.  The Final 2011 Budget will be presented to Council for approval in February of 2011.

B.(22)  Council voted to approve the following motion:

The CEO will use information from its ongoing LEED certification process to set emission goals, put policies into place to reduce the organization’s contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, and monitor progress toward those goals. The goals will meet or exceed standards set by similar businesses and organizations attempting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  The annual environmental report will be expanded to include data on APA’s progress toward meeting these goals and, if indicated, additional steps that will be taken to meet these goals. 

APA will seek to develop its capabilities to track emissions from its wider business and governance practices, especially those from transportation, and formulate means to reduce these emissions. Decision criteria for business and governance priorities (e.g., selecting initiatives) and operations (e.g., number, time, and place of meetings) will explicitly consider impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

C.(30)  Council received as information the Argy, Wiltse & Robinson, P.C. 2009 Audited-Related Reports.


On Sunday morning, a presidential citation was presented to Dorothy Cantor, PsyD; Lee Gurel, PhD, was acknowledged for his generous donation to the American Psychological Foundation and the 2010 Raymond D. Fowler Member Award was presented to Mathilda B. Canter, PhD.


AUGUST 2010 COUNCIL MEETING: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS AND VOTE TOTALS

This document provides a brief description of the action taken by Council along with the vote totals for each item. 

Votes are listed as follows: number of members in favor/number of members opposed/number of members who abstained from voting. 

“Consent” is marked for those items that were included on the consent agenda.  Items approved by consent are not discussed and are voted on as a package.  The consent agenda vote was as follows: 151/1/0


1. Approval of the Minutes of the February 19-21, 2010, Council of Representatives Meeting.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent)

2. CPI Dues Increase.  C/R voted to discontinue the annual dues increase based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) through 2013.  (76/47/1) 

3. International Fee Increase.  C/R voted to approve an increase to the standard International Affiliate membership fee to $50, phased in over a three-year period, and an increase to the International Affiliate membership fee for colleagues from developing/low income countries to $22, phased in over the same three year period.  These changes will be evaluated for the next three years to provide the Council of Representatives with an accounting of the numbers of international affiliates and budgetary consequences of this fee increase.  If the numbers of international affiliates fall during the 2011 year, then a three-year phase-in for the developed nations will occur.  If the numbers stay the same or increase, the phasing will proceed in two years, with a one-third increase in 2011 and a two-thirds increase in 2012. (106/11/1)

3A. Election of Initial Fellows.  C/R voted to elect 153 members listed to initial Fellow status, on the nomination of the indicated divisions and on the recommendation of the Fellows Committee and the Board of Directors.  (153/1/0) 

4. Report of the 2009 Presidential Task Force on the Future of Psychology as a STEM Discipline.  C/R approved main motion. (Council voted by hand; numbers not available)

5. August Council Meeting Days.  C/R voted to move its August meeting days from Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 12 noon to Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday 9 a.m. to 12 noon. (91/63/3)

6. Diversity Training for APA Governance Members.  C/R voted to affirm its support for diversity training for APA governance members and request that diversity training on the topic of "lmmigration and Immigrants" be provided to Council at its February 2011 meeting and to boards and committees at the March 2011 Consolidated Meetings.  The format of this training will reflect the recommendations of President Goodheart’s Working Group on Diversity Training, to enhance governance members' understanding of critical diversity issues.  In addition, C/R requested that, based on the Working Group recommendations and feedback from APA boards and committees, CSFC provide a report in February 2011 that includes  clarification of 1) the specific goals of diversity training for governance and 2) the evaluation of effectiveness of diversity training for governance.  (143/16/0)

7. APA Convention and Meeting Facility Contract Procedures and Cancellation Clause (NBI #26F).  C/R postponed item to its August 2011 meeting.  (103/12/1)

8. Change in Association Rule 90-6 to Clarify Role of CODAPAR in Agenda Planning Group (NBI# 23D).  C/R voted to approve motion that states 1) C/R shall receive the list of Council New Business Items and the designated referral groups assigned by the Agenda Planning Group; 2) It shall be the responsibility of C/R members to inform their various constituent groups of any items that may be relevant, whether with regard to impact, expertise, or perspective. It will be the responsibility of the constituent group to contact the referral group with such information; 3) C/R members will be provided with access to the cross-cutting agenda items when they are presented to boards and committees so that divisions and states, provinces and territories can have the opportunity to offer expertise, consider the impact, and/or share relevant perspectives with the appropriate groups. (147/6/4)

8A. Ensuring All, Ensuring All Divisions and State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Associations a Seat on the Council of Representatives.  C/R voted to forward to the Membership for a vote in November 2010 a Bylaw amendment that would ensure all divisions and state, provincial, and territorial psychological associations a seat on C/R.  (101/43/2) 

Council voted to include pro and con statements with the Bylaw amendment ballot.  (69/47/2)

9. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Extension of Recognition of Industrial-Organizational Psychology as a Specialty in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

10. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Extension of Recognition of Sport Psychology as a Proficiency in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

11. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Renewal of Recognition of Psychopharmacology as a Proficiency in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

12. CRSPPP Recommendation for Recognition of Personality Assessment as a Proficiency in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

13. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Recognition of Professional Geropsychology as a Specialty in Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

14. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Renewal of Recognition for Clinical Neuropsychology as a Specialty in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

15. CRSPPP Recommendation for the Renewal of Recognition for Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology as a Specialty in Professional Psychology.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

16. Request to Withdraw Council New Business Item #31F: Infusing the Association Guidelines in the Public Interest Which Have Been Adopted by Council for Psychologists Throughout APA.  Item withdrawn; no follow-up.  (Consent) 

17. Revised APA Resolution on Homelessness.  C/R approved main motion. (113/1/2)

18. Statement on Marriage Equality for Same Sex Couples.  C/R approved main motion.  (148/1/3) 

19. Report of the Task Force on the Psychosocial Effects of War on Children and Families Who are Refugees from Armed Conflict Residing in the United States.  C/R approved main motion.  (Consent) 

19A. Request to Withdraw Council New Business Item #32D: APA Resolution to Promote Well-being and Alleviate Psychological Risk Factors for Immigrants.  Item withdrawn; no follow-up.  (Consent) 

20. Reimbursement Policy for Ethnic Minority Members of Council.  C/R approved main motion. (98/17/4)

21. 2011 Revenues and Related Actions. C/R voted to approve the 2011 Preliminary Revenue and Expense budgets and footnotes as the basis for the Fall budget process.  The Final 2011 Budget will be presented to Council for approval in February of 2011.  (154/5/1)

22. Update Annual “Report on Environmental Issues” (NBI #26I).  C/R approved a motion that states 1)  The CEO will use information from its ongoing LEED certification process to set emission goals, put policies into place to reduce the organization’s contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, and monitor progress toward those goals. The goals will meet or exceed standards set by similar businesses and organizations attempting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  The annual environmental report will be expanded to include data on APA’s progress toward meeting these goals and, if indicated, additional steps that will be taken to meet these goals; and 2) APA will seek to develop its capabilities to track emissions from its wider business and governance practices, especially those from transportation, and formulate means to reduce these emissions. Decision criteria for business and governance priorities (e.g., selecting initiatives) and operations (e.g., number, time, and place of meetings) will explicitly consider impact on greenhouse gas emissions.  (104/9/0)