Foundation for Child Development: Young Scholars Program

The FCD fellowship supports young scholars to conduct research that aims to identify and understand the challenges faced by immigrant families and their children.

Sponsor: Foundation for Child Development

Description

The goals of the FCD Young Scholars Program are to: Stimulate both basic and policy-relevant research about the early education, health and well-being of children living in immigrant families from birth to age ten, particularly those who are living in low-income families; and support young investigators - from the behavioral and social sciences or in an allied professional field - who are untenured but in tenure-track positions or who have received tenure in the last four years from a college or university in the United States. Three to four fellowships of up to $150,000 for use over one to three years (maximum) will be awarded competitively.

Eligibility

Eligible researchers will have earned their doctoral degrees within the last 15 years, and be full-time, faculty members of a college or university in the United States. Applicants must hold a PhD or its equivalent in one of the behavioral and social sciences or in an allied professional field (e.g., public policy, public health, education, social work, nursing and medicine). Please note individuals with tenure-equivalent positions are not eligible for the fellowship.  Once selected, FCD Young Scholars must fulfill a number of requirements.

How to Apply

Please see the FCD website to apply. Due to the expected volume of calls, FCD staff will be unable to accept telephone inquiries. Please refer to Young Scholars Program Description or submit your question(s) via email to ysp@fcd-us.org.

Past Recipients

2008 Fellows: Mark Appelbaum, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego; Kathryn Edin, Visiting Professor of Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Leighton Ku, Professor, Department of Health Policy, George Washington University;